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Latest News from Yvonne Harlech

 

I am pleased to announce that Harp of Joy (the follow up to Mistress of the Temple) is soon to be released as an ebook, for all those who couldn’t get the paperback in their area. I am so excited about finally getting it out on kindle.

Harp of Joy: An enchanting tale of passion, ancient mysteries and the search for eternity.

Here’s a little glimpse of Harp of Joy’s world:

Bentreshy shuffled down the steep passageway to the Underground Library, her oil lamp flickering in the shadows. The tunnel narrowed as she descended into the earth, passing scenes from the Book of the Dead as she stumbled along, the figures in the murals sinking into the Underworld. ‘A strange way to decorate a passage to a library,’ she thought, fearing the tunnel would go on forever, her lamp growing fainter and the darkness threatening to swallow her…

 

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A glimpse of the Coffin Spells and the Book of the Dead, to guide the deceased safely through the Underworld.

 

 

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A mural reminiscent of Bentreshy’s life as a Daughter of Isis in 1290 BC

 

And now for a change of era…I am currently busy writing a new novel set in Romano-Britain, so I’ll keep you posted here and also on Facebook. I am currently researching the wonderful Roman cities in the UK – in Chester, Bath, York and Wroxeter, which are giving me great insights into Britain’s Latin heritage. I am also writing about the Celtic tribes in the area and how they survived under Roman occupation.

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My working title is Birth of Venus…

The story takes place in 1st century Deva (modern day Chester), where the women worship the river goddess and the soldiers endeavour to construct the largest fortress in Britannia. It’s an epic love story too. ♥

 

 

 

I recently went to a re-enactment day in Chester, a great way to connect with the past and experience Deva’s Roman heritage in living colours. In Chester the past is never far away…

 

Sweet Music in Roman Chester